Address

1111 West 2nd Street

Marion, IN 46952

Tel: 765-662-9910

Fax: 765-662-9918

Email: office@faulkneracademy.org

Contact Us

  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon
Nutrition is Fun

Nutrition is for Everyone

Proper nutrition in the school age years can reinforce lifelong eating habits that contribute to a student's overall well being. This will help them to grow and learn to their fullest potential... and then go on to lead a long healthy life.
 

Nutrition for Students is Fun!

Your body needs nutritious foods to grow and stay healthy, so make sure you take care of your body by eating the right food and getting plenty of exercise. Whether you are grabbing breakfast before school or choosing a snack after sports practice, now is time to start learning to make healthy choices. Your body and brain need healthy fuel to perform, to learn, to grow, and to ward off illness and disease. You will look better, feel better and do better in school and at play.

Develop the healthy eating habits today that will last a lifetime. Eat a balanced diet from each of the 5 food groups everyday... Grains, Vegetables, Fruits, Milk and Meat & Beans... and go light on the junk!

Click here for fun games!

 

Nutrition for Teachers

Students must be healthy to learn...                   
                       but they also need to learn to be healthy.    
  

 

We encourage and support health and nutrition education in the classroom. Teaching nutrition to students will help them to grow and learn to their fullest potential and we believe it is the key to promoting lifelong health and wellness. Nutrition Education establishes the basic skills for making healthy eating and lifestyle choices that will carry them into adulthood.

Our school’s breakfast and lunch programs help students to establish the healthy eating habits that they need to grow, learn and play. School lunches contain 1/3 of the recommended daily nutrient allowance and school meals include nutritious foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and calcium rich low fat milk.

Nutrition and Fitness Teacher Resource Center

​Many children are flunking healthy eating

  • Only 2 percent of students are meeting all the recommendations of the USDA Dietary Guidelines; 16 percent do not meet any

  • Less than 15 percent of school children eat the recommended servings of fruit

  • Less than 20 percent eat the recommended servings of vegetables

  • About 25 percent eat the recommended servings of grains

  • Only 30 percent consume the recommended milk group servings

  • Only 19 percent of girls ages 9 to 19 meet the recommended intakes for calcium

  • Only 16 percent of school children meet the guidelines for saturated fat


The Consequences are Troubling

  • Childhood obesity is a national epidemic, likely to result in earlier onset and increased prevalence of disease

  • The percentage of young people who are overweight has more than doubled in the past 30 years

  • Unhealthy eating and physical inactivity are causes of obesity and chronic disease, resulting in at least 300,000 deaths each year

  • Poor nutrition associated with heart disease, stroke, cancer, and diabetes, alone, now costs $71 billion a year

 

 

Nutrition for Parents

Did you know...this generation of young people is the first that is forecast to have a shorter life expectancy than their parents? 1 in 3 or 4 children born in the year 2000 will develop diabetes at some point in their lifetime. The prevalence of overweight kids among 6 to 11 year olds has doubled in the past 20 years and tripled for teens.

What are we doing about it? Our district participates in the National School Lunch Program, following strict national and state nutrition guidelines, and provides nutritious lunches that contain one-third of the recommended dietary allowance of nutrients. Our district adheres to the recommended USDA dietary guidelines from MyPlate. This new Food Guide focuses on nutrition and fitness, because the two go hand in hand. It is designed to help kids and parents to not only understand the guidelines but to also provide practical advice on how to provide healthy and balanced diet.

Recommendations are tailored for kids based on age, gender, and exercise habits. And, our district has also developed a comprehensive school wellness policy and upholds the USDA's Federally Mandated Nutritional Value requirements, which defines the nutrition guidelines for school meals.

For parents, this program offers a convenient method of providing a nutritionally balanced lunch at the lowest possible price. For schools, the program enhances children's learning abilities by contributing to their physical and mental well being. Studies have shown that children whose nutritional needs are met have fewer attendance and discipline problems and are more attentive in class.

Be a role model. Take an active role in encouraging your kids eat more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Encourage your kids to get at least 60 minutes of moderate exercise each day (30 minutes for adults). Family meals are a great time for parents to connect and share the details of the day. Plus, kids who eat regularly with their families are less likely to snack on unhealthful foods. Try to eat meals together as a family at least 3 times per week.

 
 
 
 
Non-Discrimination Statement

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339.  Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at:  http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

(1)   mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
1400 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;

(2)   fax: (202) 690-7442; or (3)  email: program.intake@usda.gov.